We Are All Content Providers Now

My final “Managing Up” post for Steyer Associates offers an abbreviated look at earlier trends in technical communications. Here’s a longer medication of being in the trenches over some of the most life-changing technical advances in the past quarter century.

Photo of Lascaux painting by Prof saxx from wikipediaA decade out of college, I first asserted in a job interview that I was a writer. Previously, my job roles had included editing—for solar designers, conservation policy advocates, and a couple of dyslexic physicists. During that “editorial” apprenticeship, I typically tossed 90 percent of what I received and rewrote it. That made me a writer, correct?

I faked my way through that interview and went to work for a local power utility, where I learned the basics of tech writing, before the profession had degree programs or professional associations.

The tech writing basics? Forget what your English teacher said: There is no practical use for creative, complex sentence structures in tech writing: Continue reading

DIY Tricks for Writers

My blog post, 5 Pet Tricks with Spreadsheets, suggests some tricks for project tracking for tech-comms professionals. For balance, here are some pet tricks for fiction writers:

“Author as Publisher” Task Lists

Author as Publisher: Planning Tasks [MS Word]
Author as Publisher: Market Planning Tasks [MS Word]

Book Scheme in a Spreadsheet
dramatic arc

Whether part of an initial plan or in the middle of an attempt to untangle spaghetti 2/3s through the draft, you can you a spreadsheet to map the plot points, action, character development, time scale, and so on.

Here’s an example of how I analyzed plot and pacing problems during an early draft of Artemis in the Desert (if you haven’t read the book, this example doesn’t contain spoilers). The top row maps chapters against traditional beat sheet goals for plot and pacing. Continue reading

Ebook and Print Production from Word

ProductionGuide-Cover_811All that advice to “just use Word”? Then the results leave something to be desired?

Here’s a step-by-step guide for converting a Microsoft Word file to a cleanly formatted, easily updated MOBI file and a POD-ready PDF.

Get a FREE PDF download:
Ebook and Print Production from Word Production Guide 

Download related files here: Sample Files – OPF, NCX, CSS
POD-template for Word
See also FAQ for Production from Word Guide

In this step-by-step guide:
– Word-to-POD-ready Print File
– Word-to-MOBI Production
– Managing Styles in Microsoft Word

For creating print-on-demand (POD) PDF files:

  • How to get headers, page numbers, front matter, and back matter to look professional, quickly.
  • How to get justified text that doesn’t look like it was done by a space alien who’s heard of “rules of written language” but doesn’t realy grok what it means.

For creating ebook files:

  • How to quickly convert from Word and get the results you intend.
  • Make chapter breaks, the Table of Contents, and navigation controls work right, quickly.
  • Control art, chapter and page decorations, and internal hyperlinks.
  • Avoid wonky line spacing and bad indents.

These notes assume that your working environment is Windows and Microsoft Word. The ebook production steps focus on creating a MOBI file (Amazon format). You can find other guides and tools for creating an ePub for other eBook retailers, using the same source files as described in this guide.

Stage Fright: Your Sample & Your Back Cover Text

My blog post for Steyer Associates — Stage Fright Part II: Your Writing Sample — examines how a tech-comms manager reviews writing samples when hiring a tech-communications professional. I discuss solutions for common problems, like when your current work sample is still under non-disclosure agreement.

FacePunchI like to describe a parallel effort here on my blog for fiction writers, but the cases differ significantly:

  • Your writing sample online is the first 10% of your ebook on Amazon. 
    Tip: Did you move the front matter to the back of your fiction ebook, so that a significant portion of that 10% is not copyright, dedication, and table of contents?Your “sample” should start as close to “a name=start” as possible.
  • Your description / back cover text is what lures your reader.
    Did you write a Fourth Grade book report or a marketing enticement that will help you “close” a sale with browsing readers?Most writers I’m met hate writing the back-cover text. It calls for an entirely different view of the story than what you just spend hundreds of hours writing. I’ve struggled with this 250 words more than any other text  I’ve drafted, and don’t feel anything like a journeyman, must less an expert. Yet it’s not something that DIY writers can readily outsource.Here’s the most succinct guidance I’ve found, for staying on track in back-cover descriptions:

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DIY Task List: Opera En Español

I’m a believer in task lists, and in breaking tasks lists into ever smaller parts—which is likely why my career as a technical writer took a turn into management. I’m working on a series of Managing Up posts for Steyer Associates about program management tasks for tech-comms professionals.

While that series develops, I’ll create some parallel entries here for fiction writing and publishing tasks for independent authors who publish their own work.

Opera_Logo-2014.C.160pxHere’s a modified task list for producing a book on the Opera En Español series that Jugum Press publishes. These are Spanish-language translations of opera librettos created by Dr. Eduardo Enrique Prado Alacalá. I keep this list to guide the tasks that must be complete when I’m publishing several librettos simultaneously.

First, for a long list of tasks, you need categories. Continue reading

Opera en Espanol: New Jugum Press Adventures

As managing editor at Jugum Press, I’m working to publish translations by Enrique Prado of major opera librettos in Spanish.

Barbiere_1913_CROPPEDMy editorial and production tasks closely resemble my twenty years’ work on technical tomes for Windows driver developers. This content, however, is farm more emotionally charged. And proofreading Windows pseudo code never prompted as many laughs as proofreading Don Pasquale.

However, it may be that some of those old Windows programmer publication projects prompted as many tears as Tosca, though less blood on the floor.

Project background: Continue reading

None Dare Call It Vanity

As the owner, managing editor, art director, and acquisition editor of Jugum Press: I’m a grown woman and I can do what I want.

And thanks to POD technology, I can finally answer to the siren call of freedom I first heard from the bearded, bushy-browed former CPUSA activist in the Southern Oregon College copy shop:

“Freedom of the press belongs to those who own the press.”*
Jugum Press

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Biscotti di Prato

That’s Italian for ‘so easy, even I can make it’—as my kids will tell you, I daydream too much in the kitchen. However, it’s December, so I’m required to produce this favorite, using a recipe from a former manager, who learned it at a famous Italian cooking school.
You can do it!
WP_20131214_004

4 ½ C flour – reserve ¼ C
2 ¼ C sugar
4 large eggs
1t vanilla
Salt

grated lemon peel  — the one time a year I use this
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